Fungi in the Buriton Chalk Pit Nature Reserve

Fungi in the Buriton Chalk Pit Nature Reserve

 
This weekend 4 walks took place, two in the Buriton LNR and two in QE Forest.
 A total of 60 people turned up to hear from fungi expert Simon Moore who has been leading walks here in the Park for many years. As well as fungi he is an expert in spiders, and the conservation of museum specimens. On this latter subject his  current  project is restoring an old stuffed King Penguin!  
 
 
Simon Moore

Simon Moore

 
 As well as interpreting this fascinating but complex subject to the visitors the secondary purpose of the walks is to compile a species list that will help with future management. Last year the rare Alder bolete was found in the Buriton site growing on a non native type of Alder which was destined for removal. The plan was quickly altered.
And this year another Red Data List species turned up on both sites. The Solitary or Spiny Headed amanita which is classified as rare and likes beech leaf litter on calcareous soils. One specimen was collected and pickled for the County’s collection and the  rest will produce spores for future years. 
 
Solitary amanita

Solitary amanita

 
 Another species found was the Sulphur tuft which is much more widespread and can be found growing on the dead and rotting trunks of broad-leaved trees.   
Sulphur tuft

Sulphur tuft

 
 All the fungi walks at QE are held for information only. No foraging takes place and there is definitely no fry up at the end. Identification of the many species of fungi should be left to the experts as at best some of those like the Solitary amanita are protected by law,  and at worst others like the Sulphur tuft are very poisonous.
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