Hawker Dragonfly emerging

Hawker Dragonfly emerging

In the few warm sunny gaps between the rain showers the Park’s damselfly and dragonfly species have been appearing from the depths of the pond. The nymphs may have spent several years under the surface and need to time their emergence carefully. 

Although the adult life is short it is dramatic as dragonflies are some of the fastest insects in the world. The larger Southern Hawkers and Emperors found in the Park will reach 30mph on the wing. They are predatory catching other flying insects such as mosquitos, and very territorial.

 5 sunny minutes spent on the bridge will reveal the constant battle between the males, and the different species, going on around the pond. 

 

In total the pond has 12 different species of dragonfly and damselfly. The former can be easily distinguished by the fact that they are larger and hold their wings away from and perpendicular to the body, whilst the latter and hold their wings together and above the torso.

Hawker emerging

Hawker emerging

Students from Liverpool University have been studying the pond’s population of the Azure Damselfly. A number of papers have been produced which study their DNA and fecundity, the most recent in 2011.

More information is avaliable on the Institute of Integrative Biology’s web-site at www.liv.ac.uk/integrative-biology    

There will be a chance to see pond life in all its forms at the Bio-Blitz event which takes place from 4pm on the 11th, through to 4pm on the 12th August.

More details on the Park Pages at www.hants.gov.uk/qecp

Advertisements