June 2012


Apprentices outside the visitor centre

Apprentices outside the visitor centre

Over the Jubilee holiday, on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, three groups of Network Rail apprentices each spent a day working in the Park.  They were spending study time at HMS Sultan in Gosport and the trip was about putting something back in to the community. A total of 80 people were involved in cutting back overgrown sections of the walking and mountain bike trails.

Over the three days despite indifferent weather conditions a vast amount of work was completed by the hardworking apprentices .

Over the course of a year the Park hosts many corporate volunteer days. In return for some hard work and enthusiasm we can provide group bbq facilities, or arrange a wildlife experience with one of the ranger team, to ensure that the day is both fun and informative. For more information about corporate opportunities contact the general enquiry line at qecp.enquiries@hants.gov.uk

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Roe doe and fawn (image by Dave Strutt)

Roe doe and fawn (image by Dave Strutt)

Of the four types of deer found at Queen Elizabeth Country Park you are most likely to see the Roe. They  are browsers living in  wooded areas in groups of 2-3 females (does) with a single male (buck).

Easy to spot in Summer they are much smaller than the Fallow Deer weighing in at only 15-30kg,  with a golden red coat and white rump patch. The tail is small and barely visible.

 

 

Life expectancy is 5 years for males and 6-7 for females. Mortality is at its highest soon after birth and during the first Winter.

The young are born in late May or June and will remain hidden until they are old enough to join the rest of the group.

Roe fawn (image by Dave Strutt)

Roe fawn (image by Dave Strutt)

The mother will suckle her fawn several times a day for the first three months. It is during this time  that they are most vulnerable to disturbance and the adults will often abandon them if they see or smell a dog or human nearby.

If you find a fawn anywhere in the Park please leave well alone and report to reception on 02392 595040.

For more information about the management of deer have a look at the British Deer Society’s web-site at www.bds.org.uk and for video footage go to the BBC Wildlife site at www.bbc.co.uk

Monday night saw about 1,000 people gathered on the top of Butser Hill to see the Jubilee Beacon and firework display. As the highest point on the South Downs there was a great view of all the other celebrations as they took place.

The Park’s rangers had set up the arena the previous week, loading 2 tonnes of timber in to a purpose-built container for the fire. The last Beacon lighting was back in 2000 for the millennium. 

The event was run in conjunction with the Petersfield and Liss Guides together with the Petersfield Scouts, and was supported by groups from across Hampshire.  

There was a torchlight procession from the main Park Centre car park with a walk of about a mile up to the trig point on top of the hill . For those looking for a shorter, easier route the car park on top of Butser proved popular.

The Beacon was lit at 10.10pm by Councillor Andrew Joy the Chairman of Hampshire County Council, ably assisted by representatives from the local Guides, Scouts and Rainbows.

At 10.15 there was an impressive firework display put on by Classic Fireworks Ltd www.classicfireworks.co.uk and then the event drew to a close at 10.30pm the time when Her Majesty the Queen was due to light the National Beacon in London.

All in all a very popular event and hopefully it will not be another 12 years before the next one!

View towards the coast and the Isle of Wight at sunset

View towards the coast and the Isle of Wight at sunset

 

Procession setting off from the Park Cantre

 

The Chairman with lighting party

The Chairman with lighting party

Photo by Dave Strutt

June 3, 2012

Sponsored Dog Walk for Cancer Research-Saturday 2nd June

Posted by qecp under Dogs, Queen Elizabeth Country Park
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Walk start

Walk start

On Saturday the local branch of Cancer Research UK put on a family fun day and sponsored dog walk in Queen Elizabeth Forest. The weather was just right, dry and not too hot for the many dogs which took part.

At 11.00am the walkers set off on the 5 mile red route which took about 2 hours to complete.

The event took place in Bottom Field and featured a number of  trade stalls for dogs and their owners together with a bouncy castle and bbq.

All the dogs were sponsored to raise money for the charity with a special prize for the highest total.

Cancer Research UK is the world’s leading charity dedicated to beating the disease through research, and with more than 1 in 3 of us likely to get  cancer, all the volunteers from the East Hants Branch did an excellent job.

For more information about their work go to www.cancerresearchuk.org

The best dressed dogs

The best dressed dogs

The next dog related event will take place at QECP on Sunday the 24th June. More details at http://www.hants.gov.uk/qecp

June 1, 2012

Visitor from Ghana

Posted by qecp under Uncategorized
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QECP recently played host to a VIP visitor when Mrs Comfort Appiah, a community leader from Ghana, came to look around the site. Comfort came from Dominase in rural Ghana as a guest of the parish of Buriton which has been linked to this area for some 10 years.

Buriton has in the past raised funds for new water supplies and health and sanitation equipment. Parish Councillor Doug Jones had organised the visit, and he and other villagers, along with East Hants District Council Officers (as volunteers), have been over to Ghana in the past to give assistance.  

Comfort has been a councillor in Ghana for 8 years and hopes that her visit to the UK will help with ideas that she can take back home.

The Park sits in the parish of Buriton and has its own twinning arrangement with Queen Elizabeth National Park in Uganda.

More information can be found on the Buriton web-site at www.buriton.info/parish_council  and on the QE volunteers site www.qecpvrs.co.uk

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